income splitting

Budget 2015-16 preview: Top 10 ways the Harper government has boosted inequality (11 actually)

1. Family Income Splitting

The federal government plans to spend about $2-billion per year on family income splitting that will mainly benefit high-income, traditional families with a stay at home spouse, to a maximum amount of $2,000 per year. There is no benefit at all from income splitting for single parents, or for two parent families in which both earners are in the same tax bracket, including the middle and bottom income tax brackets; these families with children under 18 represent over half of all families that are the apparent target of the scheme,...

The Conservatives Propose Family Policy for a Bygone Age

The Harper government’s tax package released Thursday is a throwback to the family policies of a bygone era. It turns its back on the pressing need for affordable, high quality child care; introduces a new tax measure which will mainly benefit traditional families with a stay at home spouse; and brings back the old family allowance in a modified form.

The government’s token response to calls for a national child care program is to modestly increase the Child Care Expense Deduction – representing a tiny fraction ($395 million) of the government’s package exceeding $26 billion. This...

Mad Math: Income-splitting meets Don Draper

Jennifer Robson /

In The National Post, Tasha Kheriddin critiques a recent study on income splitting by Tristat Resources for The Broadbent Institute. Kheriddin argues that income-splitting is...

Income splitting can make our tax system fair for taxpayers with young children

Tasha Kheiriddin / National Post

The issue of income-splitting — a tax policy whereby income is reattributed within a household from a higher-earning spouse to a lower-earning spouse — has been front of mind among tax experts, federal Conservative ministers and, most recently, the left-leaning Broadbent Institute. The practice advantages households in which income is predominantly earned by one spouse...

Face the facts

Editorial / The St. John's Telegram

If you don’t have the facts, it makes it that much easier to simply apply your own ideology.  But it doesn’t mean good results are on the way for everyone involved.

Two different pieces of news surfaced this week that make that point in spades. The first? While the federal Conservatives were arguing that job numbers were showing that the country needed more workers in the temporary foreign workers program, the...

Who wins with income splitting?

If Stephen Harper’s goal was to design a tax policy to make income inequality in this country even worse, he can pat himself on the back. That’s exactly what the Conservatives’ family income-splitting tax scheme will do.

Research from various organizations across the political spectrum has demonstrated already that this tax policy, projected to cost the federal treasury $3 billion in 2015, would be an expensive and inequitable tax giveaway.

Pushed by social conservative groups like the Institute of Marriage and the Family Canada and REAL Women of Canada, income-splitting...

Broadbent Institute study finds income splitting would result in many losers, few winners, big regional variations

Detailed analysis of Conservative proposal reveals deeply unequal scheme

OTTAWA—Two out of three families targeted by the Conservative income splitting plan would receive less than $500 while fewer than 4% of such families – some of the wealthiest in Canada – would be eligible for a benefit in excess of $5,000, a new study by the Broadbent Institute has found.

The Big Split: Income Splitting's Unequal Distribution of Benefits Across Canada, based on a statistical analysis by Tristat Resources on behalf of the Broadbent Institute,...

Most Canadians wouldn't benefit from income splitting

Jessica Hume / Toronto Sun

The NDP used its last opposition day this session to rail against the government's proposal to allow income splitting, saying it would help too few Canadians and not those most in need.

Income splitting allows couples to redistribute their wealth in order to pay less tax. During the last election, the Conservatives promised that once the budget is balanced they would allow spouses with children under age 18 to share up...

Opposition push income splitting motion on Tories

Annie Bergeron-Oliver /

The government’s commitment to a controversial election promise will be tested Tuesday when the Opposition forces a vote on a motion opposing income splitting.

New Democrats are using their last opposition day of the spring sitting to push the proposal that has caused apparent splits within the ranks of the Conservative caucus this year.

Before stepping down as finance minister, the late Jim Flaherty ...

Income splitting benefits flow to west: study

Julian Beltrame / Canadian Press

Employment Minister Jason Kenney says the Harper government has no intention of backing away from its income splitting pledge, despite a new report concluding the plan would exacerbate income inequality and bestow the most benefits to the West.

Kenney made the statement in the House of Commons on Tuesday while debating an NDP motion to do away with the idea.

The report by the left-leaning...


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