The Broadbent Blog

THE HUB FOR CANADA’S LEADING PROGRESSIVE VOICES.

Disclaimer: the opinions expressed herein are those of the author and not necessarily those of the Institute.

The Power Lab - Strengthening local organizing for fair economies

Introducing the Power Lab, led by Broadbent Institute’s Director of Leadership & Training, Alejandra Bravo.

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Facing stark challenges, Notley government delivers on progressive change

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In the midst of the catastrophic fires that have devastated homes and livelihoods in the city of Fort McMurray, the Alberta government has declared a state of emergency. All focus is now on ensuring the safety of Albertans in this time of need.

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Christy Clark's inaction on housing affordability speaks volumes

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When Christy Clark’s government released its budget in February, many advocates were hoping for real action on soaring housing costs. British Columbia’s economy is growing and investments in affordable housing in this budget – for the last full fiscal year before going to the polls in 2017 – had the potential to address the severe crisis many British Columbians are facing.  

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The problem with cities asking for a share of the marijuana tax


This article originally appeared in Maclean's on December 21st, 2017. 
Brittany Andrew-Amofah is the Broadbent Institute's Senior Policy Research Analyst.

Municipalities’ requests for marijuana money to bolster police budgets will require a hard look at the impact of the drug’s criminalization.

 

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Don’t let supply management myths spoil the milk

This article originally appeared in the Globe & Mail.

The way Canadian dairy farmers are portrayed in the NAFTA debate might lead you to believe they drive Porsches to the milking barns. Farmers who own quota in our food system, where dairy along with poultry fall under supply management, are often portrayed as a lobby group rather than people we rely on for food security.

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Doug Ford and the contradictions of right-wing populism

The election of the new Conservative government in Ontario has been widely seen as a victory for the populist right. Certainly the new Premier, Doug Ford, claims to speak for “the little guy” in opposition to the so-called “liberal elites.” But, like Donald Trump and right-wing populists in Europe, he is likely to disappoint many of his supporters since he lacks a coherent economic strategy that will truly benefit his base.

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Broadbent Reads: Pierre Trudeau, the Liberals and the Social Democratic Left

What is the true nature of the Liberal Party of Canada? Is it a genuinely progressive party of the centre-left, worthy of the support of those pushing for a more equal and inclusive society? Or is it essentially a party of the status quo which campaigns from the left but generally governs from the right? These questions have a rich historical dimension which remains relevant today.

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Towards a new Canadian trade strategy

Globalization in Question?

The future of the neo liberal global economic order is seemingly in play. Brexit, President Trump's “America First” threat to both the NAFTA and the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the growing strength of the anti European Union right pose a threat to business as usual. However, there is room for doubt over the staying power of right-wing populism, which owes more to racism than to economic nationalism per se.  And corporate interests are mobilizing to preserve the very real gains they secured for themselves under the the current global trade regime, including NAFTA.

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The winding road to a national pharmacare program

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The Report of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health, “Pharmacare Now, Prescription Medicine Coverage for all Canadians” released on April 18 marks a step forward towards a national program covering all Canadians, but also opens up some major political questions.

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Keep expectations high for antiracism consultations

This article first appeared April 10, 2018 in Policy Options.

The Liberal government shouldn’t bend to critics of its antiracism consultations, but it should also know racialized Canadians expect meaningful change.

The federal government is about to embark on nationwide antiracism consultations. The initiative is not without its naysayers. The announcement of the $23-million plan in the 2018 budget has been critiqued by prominent Conservative MP Maxime Bernier and media pundits. Warnings to the government to “be careful” and to “keep a low profile” have cast a shadow over the process before it has even begun. If the Liberals intend to follow through on their statement of “standing up for diversity” and “building communities where everyone feels included,” backing down from the consultations and giving in to mainstream media and the right is not an option. Rather, their goal should be to ensure that the time of racialized Canadians and Indigenous people isn’t wasted by this process and that these consultations result in much-needed policy changes.

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